NSA taps Yahoo, Google data flows — SALESFORCE offers DIY app store — Kids flee FACEBOOK — SCHILLER: Goldman better than Google for grads

October 31, 2013 06:00 PDT | 09:00 EDT | 13:00 UTC

Not a TechBrief subscriber? Sign up for a free subscription.

>> DRIVING THE DAY: NSA infiltrates links to Yahoo, Google data centers worldwide, Snowden documents say, by Barton Gellman, Ashkan Soltani: “The National Security Agency has secretly broken into the main communications links that connect Yahoo and Google data centers around the world… By tapping those links, the agency has positioned itself to collect at will from hundreds of millions of user accounts, many of them belonging to Americans. The NSA does not keep everything it collects, but it keeps a lot… The NSA’s principal tool to exploit the data links is a project called MUSCULAR, operated jointly with the agency’s British counterpart, GCHQ… From undisclosed interception points, the NSA and the GCHQ are copying entire data flows across fiber-optic cables that carry information among the data centers of the Silicon Valley giants.” WaPo
>>>> How the NSA is infiltrating private networks WaPo
>>>> PRISM already gave the NSA access to tech giants. Here’s why it wanted more. WaPo The Switch
>>>> NSA issues non-denial denial of infiltrating Google and Yahoo’s networks TechDirt
>>>> What’s on tap at the NSA? Google’s and Yahoo’s private fiber backbones InfoWorld
>>>> No US action, so states move on privacy law NY Times (paywalled)

>> GOING PRIVATE: Salesforce.com to offer private version of its AppExchange app store, by Chris Kanaracus: “Salesforce.com has long had a public AppExchange software marketplace, but now it’s going to give customers the ability to create their own private AppExchanges where employees can download applications to use in their jobs. Private AppExchange is generally available as of Friday to customers running Salesforce.com’s Enterprise and higher editions.” InfoWorld
>>>> Salesforce.com launches private AppExchange — because the world loves appstores Forbes

>> SPY VS. SPY: Silent Circle, Lavabit unite for ‘Dark Mail’ encrypted email project: “Silent Circle and Lavabit abruptly halted their encrypted email services in August, saying they could no longer guarantee email would remain private after court actions against Lavabit, reportedly an email provider for NSA leaker Edward Snowden… Dark Mail would shield both the content of an email and its ‘metadata,’ including ‘to’ and ‘from’ data, IP addresses and headers. The email providers hope a version will be ready by next year.” InfoWorld
>>>> Announcing the Dark Mail Alliance — founded by Silent Circle & Lavabit Silent Circle blog
>>>> Lavabit to release code as open source, as it creates Dark Mail Alliance to build even more secure email TechDirt

>> CLOUDUS INTERRUPTUS: Microsoft’s Windows Azure cloud hit by worldwide interruption, by Mikael Ricknäs: “Microsoft’s Windows Azure suffered from an issue on Wednesday that affected a management feature in the compute section of the public cloud, and remained unresolved Thursday morning. Microsoft first updated the Windows Azure Service Dashboard at 2:35 AM UTC… About 17 hours later the company posted a message saying that manual actions to perform so-called swap deployment operations may fail, and users should therefore delay them. Microsoft was still struggling to solve the issue on Thursday morning.” InfoWorld

>> COMING ATTRACTIONS: EU researchers create prototype for a server-free future internet, by David Meyer: “Today’s Internet is based on client devices such as PCs or smartphones talking to centralized servers to get their data. If an EU-funded project called Pursuit takes flight, the future could be a whole lot more distributed… The Cambridge University prototype would represent a dramatic revamp of that way of doing things. Part of a wider EU-funded project called Pursuit, the putative protocol operates more like… BitTorrent, in that users share information directly with one another, rather than through a server.” GigaOM
>>>> Future Internet aims to sever links with servers Phys.org

>> STAT DU JOUR: Sony slips into loss despite pick up in smartphone sales, by John Ribeiro: “Losses widened in the quarter to ¥19.3 billion (US$196 million) from ¥15.5 billion in the same quarter last year. Revenue for the quarter was close to ¥1.8 trillion, a 10.6 percent increase over the same quarter last year. Revenue, however, decreased 9 percent in constant currency, reflecting the volatility of the Yen. Sony reported in the last quarter a modest profit of ¥3.5 billion which it attributed to improved sales of smartphones and the favorable impact of foreign exchange rates, continuing a turnaround that started in the last fiscal year, when it posted its first profit in many years… also revised downwards its revenue and net profit outlook for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2014, after revising its annual sales forecasts for certain product lines.” PCWorld

>> PREMATURELY GRAY: Facebook beats on revenues and EPS but teen users show decline, by Jim Edwards: “It’s a big beat on both revenues and EPS, and the stock popped up 15% immediately in after hours trading…. But then it gave up most of those gains when CFO David Ebersman said the company had seen a small reduction in use by teens…. But no one at Facebook has ever admitted before that it may be losing teens. Ebersman said the stats were not significant: ‘We did see a decrease in daily users partly among younger teens. … This is of questionable significance.’… The reason: Investors bet on the future, not what just happened. And if kids are losing interest in Facebook that could create headwinds in terms of future user growth.” Business Insider
>>>> Facebook earnings show that desktop ads — and Google — may soon become irrelevant VentureBeat
>>>> Facebook may start logging your cursor movements Ars Technica

>> GONE TO PLAID: Sprint taps into its spectrum for fast LTE, with room to grow, by Stephen Lawson: “…demonstrated a high-speed service it calls Sprint Spark, with current peak speeds of 50-60Mbps (bits per second) and the potential to exceed 1Gbps. It also promoted three upcoming handsets that will be able to take advantage of all three of its spectrum bands. Sprint is in catch-up mode against its bigger rivals, Verizon Wireless and AT&T, and is looking to use its huge spectrum holdings as an advantage. The company is deploying LTE in its 800MHz and 1.9GHz bands as well as the 2.5GHz spectrum it acquired with Clearwire, on which the Sprint Spark service runs.” PCWorld
>>>> New cable broadband spec says 10 Gbps speeds possible Now if we could just come up with a better name than ‘DOCSIS 3.1’ Cable Tech Talk

>> MAN BITES DOG: Robert Shiller: Young people with a moral purpose should work for Goldman Sachs, not Google, by Alison Griswold: “In a debate titled ‘Goldman Vs. Google: A career on Wall Street or in Silicon Valley?’ at The Economist’s Buttonwood Gathering, the esteemed economist argued that young graduates with a ‘moral purpose’ and interest in the financial world should work for Goldman Sachs instead of Google…. ‘When you study finance, you are studying how to make things happen, on a big scale, on a lasting scale,’ Shiller said. ‘That has to matter more than getting into Google and programming some little gimmick.’ The way Shiller sees it, finance underscores every worthwhile pursuit. ‘Every human activity that matters has to be financed,’ he explained. ‘You cannot do good things for the world all by yourself.'” Business Insider

>> CRASH: Google DNS departs Brazil ahead of new law, by Doug Madory: “Brazil is pressing ahead with a new law to require Internet companies like Google to store data about Brazilian users inside Brazil, where it will be subject to local privacy laws. The proposed legislation could be signed into law as early as the end of this week… By moving DNS resolution out of Brazil and back to the United States, Google DNS now operates outside of Brazilian jurisdiction. It still works just fine for Latin American users, just much more slowly… if Google leaves Brazil as they did in China, they could opt to make their local infrastructure investments in another country… with privacy laws more to their liking.” Renesys

>> END OF LIFE CYCLE: The case against Gmail, by Ed Bott: “Google’s flagship service has been showing signs that it’s past its prime. In particular, Gmail’s losing the ability to play nicely with third-party clients… Despite Google’s lofty rhetoric about open standards, the Gmail protocols are undocumented and not available for licensing… in December 2012 Google dropped [Microsoft’s] Exchange ActiveSync support for its nonpaying customers–including anyone with a free Gmail account and with a free (grandfathered) Google Apps account… Google wants you to interact with Gmail in a browser window–preferably Chrome–or in one of its iOS or Android apps.” ZDNet
>>>> How I switched from Gmail to Outlook.com (and how you can too) ZDNet
>>>> Outlook.com calendar maintenance enters its second week PCWorld

>> GOING VIRAL: Waiting for the next great technology critic, by Pat Buchanan: “For well over a decade, the two most influential voices about consumer technology have been a sixty-six-year-old man who lives just outside of Washington, D.C. and a fifty-year-old man who resides in Westport, Connecticut. The former, Walt Mossberg, defined what it means to be a mainstream gadget reviewer when he started a weekly column, Personal Technology, for the Wall Street Journal, in 1991. The latter, David Pogue, began his column for the New York Times, State of the Art, in 2000. Every week, like a modern-day Prometheus handing down secret knowledge about arcane tools, they have dutifully informed millions of readers about the latest gadgets or services, and whether or not they are worth purchasing. Both of them will be gone soon: it was announced last month that Mossberg would leave the Journal at the end of the year, and Pogue revealed last week that he would be leaving the Times shortly.” The New Yorker

>> MICROSOFT MISCHIEF: Microsoft Bing tests ‘Hero’ ads in Windows 8.1 search results, jousting with Google, by Todd Bishop: “Hero Ads… blend elements of display and search advertising. They are being tested by advertisers including Land Rover, Jaguar, Home Depot, Norwegian Cruise Line, and Radio Shack. During the pilot, the ads will be shown to a subset of people searching for the specific names of the companies or brands on Windows 8.1.” GeekWire
>>>> Here come Windows 8.1’s ‘Hero’ ads — brought to you by stealthy snooping InfoWorld

>> IBM gives up fight to build CIA’s $600m secret cloud, hands deal to Amazon The Register

>> Scott McNealy tells Hong Kong to go open, free and global Computerworld HK

>> Google’s Glass accessory store is coming online (Wow. Stuff’s expensive!) Marketing Land

>> What’s it like to design the future of Microsoft? Ask this guy. TechNet

>> SAP confirms 20 customers live on HANA cloud, hundreds in the pipeline Computerworld UK

>> Steam rises to 65 million active users, eclipsing Xbox Live The Verge

>> 10 common tasks for MongoDB InfoWorld

>> Fantastical 2: The calendar Apple should have built… again 9to5Mac

>> Mobile saturation means innovation will slow InfoWorld

>> World’s first Bitcoin ATM sees 81 exchanges, $10,000 in transactions during first day GeekWire

>> California woman gets the first ticket for driving with Google Glass Glass Almanac

>> SORRY, WE HAD TO RUN IT: Lenovo taps Ashton Kutcher in long-life battery challenge to Apple Bloomberg

>> TWEET O’ THE DAY: “This is the only time the city of Boston has ever punished a Cardinal.” @rilaws

FEED ME, SEYMOUR: Comments? Questions? Tips? Shoot mail to Trent or Woody. Follow @gegax or @woodyleonhard.

Pass it on. Tweet us!

Not a TechBrief subscriber? Sign up for a free subscription.

Source: http://www.infoworld.com/t/technology-business/nsa-taps-yahoo-google-data-flows-salesforce-offers-diy-app-store-kids-flee-facebook-schiller-goldman-be?source=rss_infoworld_blogs
Category: julianne hough   arcade fire   legend of korra   pharrell   alexander skarsgard  

Advertisements

Space dogs and quantum fields: Winners of AIP’s 2013 Science Communication Awards announced

Space dogs and quantum fields: Winners of AIP’s 2013 Science Communication Awards announced

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

30-Oct-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
301-209-3091
American Institute of Physics

Authors Tom Siegfried and Jeffrey Bennett honored


Washington, D.C., Oct. 30, 2013 The American Institute of Physics (AIP) has named a journalist and a children’s book author as winners of the 2013 AIP Science Communications Awards for their works on the discovery of the Higgs boson and a dog’s imaginary trip to the Moon.

Tom Siegfried will receive the prize in the science writing category for his essay “Nature’s Secrets Foretold,” published in Science News magazine. Jeffrey Bennett will receive the award in the writing for children category for his book Max Goes to the Moon.

The selection committees praised Siegfried’s article for its skillful and engaging writing, which made a complex topic accessible to a general audience, and Bennett’s book for its delightful blend of fact and fiction.

“Bennett’s imaginative storytelling and Siegfried’s elegant descriptions of complex concepts make these two pieces as engaging they are informative,” said Catherine O’Riordan, AIP vice president for Physics Resources. “Their efforts provide readers with context for important discoveries and fundamental scientific concepts, and AIP is pleased to recognize their work.”

Each winner will receive a $3,000 check, an inscribed Windsor chair, and a certificate of recognition from AIP. The awards will be presented at the American Astronomical Society (AAS) 2014 winter meeting in National Harbor, Md.


Celebrating Math’s Power to Predict

For decades, physicists thought they knew why nature’s basic particles possess mass. There had to be a field permeating all of space that impeded changes in a particle’s motion, creating inertia, the hallmark of mass. Such a field, properly energized, would reveal itself by the appearance of a particle called the Higgs boson. Its discovery at the Large Hadron Collider was a landmark in physics history, but the implications went far beyond explaining the origin of mass.

In his essay “Nature’s Secrets Foretold,” published in Science News magazine, Siegfried seeks to provide a broader perspective for this recent discovery: first, that the Higgs field, by conferring mass on particles, made all the complexities of nature possible, from atoms and molecules to people and planets; and second, that the Higgs discovery was a validation of the idea that humans can use mathematical ingenuity to discern nature’s deepest secrets. Formulations developed by Peter Higgs and other scientists foresaw the existence of something that, in order to be proven, required the construction of a multibillion-dollar machine.



Tom Siegfried is a freelance writer and editor who currently writes the Context blog at http://www.sciencenews.org. From 2007 to 2012 he was the editor in chief of Science News, and previously he was the science editor of The Dallas Morning News. In addition to Science News, his work has appeared in Science, Nature, Astronomy, New Scientist, and Smithsonian. He is the author of three books: The Bit and the Pendulum, (Wiley, 2000); Strange Matters (National Academy of Sciences’ Joseph Henry Press, 2002); and A Beautiful Math (2006, Joseph Henry Press).

Tom was born in Lakewood, Ohio, and grew up in nearby Avon. He earned an undergraduate degree from Texas Christian University with majors in journalism, chemistry and history, and has an MA with a major in journalism and a minor in physics from the University of Texas at Austin.

His awards include the American Geophysical Union’s Robert C. Cowen Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism, the Science in Society Award from the National Association of Science Writers, the American Association for the Advancement of Science-Westinghouse Award, and the American Chemical Society’s James T. Grady-James H. Stack Award for Interpreting Chemistry for the Public. He is currently on the board of directors and serves as treasurer for the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing (CASW).


Moon’s Best Friend

Max Goes to the Moon tells the story of a dog (Max) and a young girl who join in the first human trip to the Moon since the Apollo era. Like all of his books, said author Jeffrey Bennett, it is designed to provide education, through scientifically accurate content; perspective, by helping readers learn to see themselves and our planet in a new light; and inspiration, by encouraging children to dream of how they can help make the world a better place and perhaps travel to space themselves someday.



Max Goes to the Moon has been made into a planetarium show and was read from orbit by astronaut Alvin Drew during the final mission of the Space Shuttle Discovery. It is now set for launch to the International Space Station, where it and Bennett’s four other children’s books (Max Goes to Mars, Max Goes to Jupiter, Max Goes to the Space Station, and The Wizard Who Saved the World) will be the first five books read in the new “Story Time From Space” program. Max Goes to the Moon is available in both English and Spanish (Max viaja a la luna).

Jeffrey Bennett holds a BA in biophysics from the University of California, San Diego, and an MS and PhD in astrophysics from the University of Colorado, Boulder. His extensive experience in research and education includes teaching at every level from preschool through graduate school, proposing and helping to develop the Voyage Scale Model Solar System on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., and serving two years as a visiting senior scientist at NASA Headquarters. He is the lead author of best-selling college textbooks in astronomy, astrobiology, mathematics, and statistics, and of several books for the general public including Math for Life (Big Kid Science, 2014), and the forthcoming What is Relativity? (Columbia University Press, 2014). His personal web site is http://www.jeffreybennett.com.

###


About the AIP Science Communication Awards

The AIP Science Communication Awards aim to promote effective science communication in print and new media in order to improve the general public’s appreciation of physics, astronomy, and allied science fields. The awards are presented at venues that best highlight the science covered in the publications.

For more information, contact Jason Socrates Bardi or visit the AIP website.


About AIP

The American Institute of Physics is an organization of scientific societies in the physical sciences, representing scientists, engineers, and educators. AIP offers information, services, and expertise in physics education and student programs, science communication, government relations, career services for science and engineering professionals, statistical research in physics employment and education, industrial outreach, and the history of physics and allied fields. AIP publishes the flagship magazine, Physics Today, and is home to the Society of Physics Students and the Niels Bohr Library and Archives. AIP owns AIP Publishing LLC, a scholarly publisher in the physical and related sciences. http://www.aip.org



[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail


Share Share

]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Space dogs and quantum fields: Winners of AIP’s 2013 Science Communication Awards announced

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

30-Oct-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
301-209-3091
American Institute of Physics

Authors Tom Siegfried and Jeffrey Bennett honored


Washington, D.C., Oct. 30, 2013 The American Institute of Physics (AIP) has named a journalist and a children’s book author as winners of the 2013 AIP Science Communications Awards for their works on the discovery of the Higgs boson and a dog’s imaginary trip to the Moon.

Tom Siegfried will receive the prize in the science writing category for his essay “Nature’s Secrets Foretold,” published in Science News magazine. Jeffrey Bennett will receive the award in the writing for children category for his book Max Goes to the Moon.

The selection committees praised Siegfried’s article for its skillful and engaging writing, which made a complex topic accessible to a general audience, and Bennett’s book for its delightful blend of fact and fiction.

“Bennett’s imaginative storytelling and Siegfried’s elegant descriptions of complex concepts make these two pieces as engaging they are informative,” said Catherine O’Riordan, AIP vice president for Physics Resources. “Their efforts provide readers with context for important discoveries and fundamental scientific concepts, and AIP is pleased to recognize their work.”

Each winner will receive a $3,000 check, an inscribed Windsor chair, and a certificate of recognition from AIP. The awards will be presented at the American Astronomical Society (AAS) 2014 winter meeting in National Harbor, Md.


Celebrating Math’s Power to Predict

For decades, physicists thought they knew why nature’s basic particles possess mass. There had to be a field permeating all of space that impeded changes in a particle’s motion, creating inertia, the hallmark of mass. Such a field, properly energized, would reveal itself by the appearance of a particle called the Higgs boson. Its discovery at the Large Hadron Collider was a landmark in physics history, but the implications went far beyond explaining the origin of mass.

In his essay “Nature’s Secrets Foretold,” published in Science News magazine, Siegfried seeks to provide a broader perspective for this recent discovery: first, that the Higgs field, by conferring mass on particles, made all the complexities of nature possible, from atoms and molecules to people and planets; and second, that the Higgs discovery was a validation of the idea that humans can use mathematical ingenuity to discern nature’s deepest secrets. Formulations developed by Peter Higgs and other scientists foresaw the existence of something that, in order to be proven, required the construction of a multibillion-dollar machine.



Tom Siegfried is a freelance writer and editor who currently writes the Context blog at http://www.sciencenews.org. From 2007 to 2012 he was the editor in chief of Science News, and previously he was the science editor of The Dallas Morning News. In addition to Science News, his work has appeared in Science, Nature, Astronomy, New Scientist, and Smithsonian. He is the author of three books: The Bit and the Pendulum, (Wiley, 2000); Strange Matters (National Academy of Sciences’ Joseph Henry Press, 2002); and A Beautiful Math (2006, Joseph Henry Press).

Tom was born in Lakewood, Ohio, and grew up in nearby Avon. He earned an undergraduate degree from Texas Christian University with majors in journalism, chemistry and history, and has an MA with a major in journalism and a minor in physics from the University of Texas at Austin.

His awards include the American Geophysical Union’s Robert C. Cowen Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism, the Science in Society Award from the National Association of Science Writers, the American Association for the Advancement of Science-Westinghouse Award, and the American Chemical Society’s James T. Grady-James H. Stack Award for Interpreting Chemistry for the Public. He is currently on the board of directors and serves as treasurer for the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing (CASW).


Moon’s Best Friend

Max Goes to the Moon tells the story of a dog (Max) and a young girl who join in the first human trip to the Moon since the Apollo era. Like all of his books, said author Jeffrey Bennett, it is designed to provide education, through scientifically accurate content; perspective, by helping readers learn to see themselves and our planet in a new light; and inspiration, by encouraging children to dream of how they can help make the world a better place and perhaps travel to space themselves someday.



Max Goes to the Moon has been made into a planetarium show and was read from orbit by astronaut Alvin Drew during the final mission of the Space Shuttle Discovery. It is now set for launch to the International Space Station, where it and Bennett’s four other children’s books (Max Goes to Mars, Max Goes to Jupiter, Max Goes to the Space Station, and The Wizard Who Saved the World) will be the first five books read in the new “Story Time From Space” program. Max Goes to the Moon is available in both English and Spanish (Max viaja a la luna).

Jeffrey Bennett holds a BA in biophysics from the University of California, San Diego, and an MS and PhD in astrophysics from the University of Colorado, Boulder. His extensive experience in research and education includes teaching at every level from preschool through graduate school, proposing and helping to develop the Voyage Scale Model Solar System on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., and serving two years as a visiting senior scientist at NASA Headquarters. He is the lead author of best-selling college textbooks in astronomy, astrobiology, mathematics, and statistics, and of several books for the general public including Math for Life (Big Kid Science, 2014), and the forthcoming What is Relativity? (Columbia University Press, 2014). His personal web site is http://www.jeffreybennett.com.

###


About the AIP Science Communication Awards

The AIP Science Communication Awards aim to promote effective science communication in print and new media in order to improve the general public’s appreciation of physics, astronomy, and allied science fields. The awards are presented at venues that best highlight the science covered in the publications.

For more information, contact Jason Socrates Bardi or visit the AIP website.


About AIP

The American Institute of Physics is an organization of scientific societies in the physical sciences, representing scientists, engineers, and educators. AIP offers information, services, and expertise in physics education and student programs, science communication, government relations, career services for science and engineering professionals, statistical research in physics employment and education, industrial outreach, and the history of physics and allied fields. AIP publishes the flagship magazine, Physics Today, and is home to the Society of Physics Students and the Niels Bohr Library and Archives. AIP owns AIP Publishing LLC, a scholarly publisher in the physical and related sciences. http://www.aip.org



[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail


Share Share

]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-10/aiop-sda103013.php
Similar Articles: Monika Jakisic   how i met your mother   Ray Rice   Colorado flooding   Anna Kendrick  

Start your week off right with these excellent stories from the urban world.

Start your week off right with these excellent stories from the urban world. This week: baseball economics, a ghastly smelling tour, Canadian sewers, radical policing tactics, and more.

Read more…

    



Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/uYAo76A_itg/start-your-week-off-right-with-these-excellent-stories-1453752353
Tags: daylight savings time   aaron hernandez   robin thicke   Jesse Jackson Jr   Riley Cooper Racial Slur Video  

Many bushfires in New South Wales, Australia

Many bushfires in New South Wales, Australia

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

28-Oct-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center


NASA’s Terra satellite detected dozens of bushfires continued raging in the Australian state of New South Wales, outside of Sydney. Sydney is the state capital and the most populated city in Australia.

According to CNN, emergency managers in New South Wales declared a state of emergency. On Oct. 22, CNN reported that New South Wales was battling 62 fires on Oct. 22. More than 116,167 hectares (~287,000 acres) have already burned.

NASA’s Terra satellite passed over New South Wales, located in southeastern Australia on Oct. 27 at 00:10 UTC/Oct. 26 at 8:10 a.m. EDT. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard Terra satellite has infrared capabilities that can detect heat from the various wildfires. In the MODIS image the fire or hot spot appears red and smoke appears in light brown. The MODIS image showed that many fires and a large area of smoke from the combined fires were occurring in the Wollemi National Park, located northwest of Sydney. The MODIS image was generated at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

###

Image: Jeff Schmaltz, NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team; Caption: Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center



[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail


Share Share

]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Many bushfires in New South Wales, Australia

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

28-Oct-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Rob Gutro
robert.j.gutro@nasa.gov
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center


NASA’s Terra satellite detected dozens of bushfires continued raging in the Australian state of New South Wales, outside of Sydney. Sydney is the state capital and the most populated city in Australia.

According to CNN, emergency managers in New South Wales declared a state of emergency. On Oct. 22, CNN reported that New South Wales was battling 62 fires on Oct. 22. More than 116,167 hectares (~287,000 acres) have already burned.

NASA’s Terra satellite passed over New South Wales, located in southeastern Australia on Oct. 27 at 00:10 UTC/Oct. 26 at 8:10 a.m. EDT. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard Terra satellite has infrared capabilities that can detect heat from the various wildfires. In the MODIS image the fire or hot spot appears red and smoke appears in light brown. The MODIS image showed that many fires and a large area of smoke from the combined fires were occurring in the Wollemi National Park, located northwest of Sydney. The MODIS image was generated at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

###

Image: Jeff Schmaltz, NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team; Caption: Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center



[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail


Share Share

]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-10/nsfc-mbi102813.php
Category: kansas city chiefs   will ferrell   Cecily Strong   aaliyah   Chris Siegfried  

Crying wolf: Who benefits and when?

Crying wolf: Who benefits and when?

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

28-Oct-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Tracy James
traljame@iu.edu
812-855-0084
Indiana University

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — A crisis at work can bring out the best in colleagues, often inspiring more cooperation and self-sacrifice. A new study from Indiana University and the University of Guelphhas found that the benefits are not shared equally, with higher-ranking group members having the most to gain by perceived threats to the group.

“Sociologists have known for a long time that groups tend to come together when they face adversity,” said social psychologist Stephen Benard, assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at IU Bloomington. “What our research highlights is that there is a downside to our tendency to stick together when things are tough — powerful group members can exploit that tendency to distract us from competing with them.”

The study, “Who cries wolf, and when? Manipulation of perceived threats to preserve rank in cooperative groups,” was published in the online journal Proceedings of the Library of Science One in September. Pat Barclay, assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at University of Guelph in Canada is the co-author.

Benard and Barclay tested their theories by creating three-person groups and having them play a cooperative group game in which people could pay money to increase the perception of threat to their group. They found that people with higher-ranking positions paid more to manipulate the threat and the action helped maintain their privileged positions.

“With this approach, we find people in high-ranking positions are more likely to manipulate apparent threats when their position is precarious, compared to when it is secure,” Benard said.

But this doesn’t mean the next crisis at work is a ploy by the boss to boost her job security. Social science predictions involve the average person, in general, not specific people or situations.

“When groups face potential threats, it’s important to judge those threats carefully,” Benard said. “On one hand, you want to be alert to the fact that other group members might have an incentive to exaggerate the threat. On the other hand, it’s also important not to underestimate threats that could be real.

###

The study, found at http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0073863, was supported by the National Science Foundation in conjunction with the Minerva Initiative of the U.S. department of Defense and the Cornell University Institute for Social Sciences.

To speak with Benard, contact Tracy James at 812-855-0084 and traljame@iu.edu.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail


Share Share

]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Crying wolf: Who benefits and when?

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

28-Oct-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Tracy James
traljame@iu.edu
812-855-0084
Indiana University

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — A crisis at work can bring out the best in colleagues, often inspiring more cooperation and self-sacrifice. A new study from Indiana University and the University of Guelphhas found that the benefits are not shared equally, with higher-ranking group members having the most to gain by perceived threats to the group.

“Sociologists have known for a long time that groups tend to come together when they face adversity,” said social psychologist Stephen Benard, assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at IU Bloomington. “What our research highlights is that there is a downside to our tendency to stick together when things are tough — powerful group members can exploit that tendency to distract us from competing with them.”

The study, “Who cries wolf, and when? Manipulation of perceived threats to preserve rank in cooperative groups,” was published in the online journal Proceedings of the Library of Science One in September. Pat Barclay, assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at University of Guelph in Canada is the co-author.

Benard and Barclay tested their theories by creating three-person groups and having them play a cooperative group game in which people could pay money to increase the perception of threat to their group. They found that people with higher-ranking positions paid more to manipulate the threat and the action helped maintain their privileged positions.

“With this approach, we find people in high-ranking positions are more likely to manipulate apparent threats when their position is precarious, compared to when it is secure,” Benard said.

But this doesn’t mean the next crisis at work is a ploy by the boss to boost her job security. Social science predictions involve the average person, in general, not specific people or situations.

“When groups face potential threats, it’s important to judge those threats carefully,” Benard said. “On one hand, you want to be alert to the fact that other group members might have an incentive to exaggerate the threat. On the other hand, it’s also important not to underestimate threats that could be real.

###

The study, found at http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0073863, was supported by the National Science Foundation in conjunction with the Minerva Initiative of the U.S. department of Defense and the Cornell University Institute for Social Sciences.

To speak with Benard, contact Tracy James at 812-855-0084 and traljame@iu.edu.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail


Share Share

]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-10/iu-cww102813.php
Tags: Grambling State University   elton john   cbs sports   Jack Nicholson   Lleyton Hewitt  

Cheney: GOP needs to look to new generation

WASHINGTON (AP) — Dick Cheney said Sunday that Republicans need to look to a new generation of leaders as the party deals with poor approval ratings following the government shutdown.

The former vice president said Republicans have faced challenges before and it’s healthy for the party to work to rebuild.

The GOP “got whipped” in the 2012 presidential campaign, when President Barack Obama won re-election over Mitt Romney, and the party needs to build its base of supporters and find “first-class” candidates and turn to a new generation of leaders, Cheney told ABC’s “This Week.”

“It’s not the first time we have had to go down this road and it’s basically, I think, healthy for the party to be brought up short, say, OK, now it’s time to go to work,” Cheney said.

He predicted that his daughter, Liz Cheney, would win her Senate primary challenge against Republican Sen. Mike Enzi of Wyoming next year. The former vice president said it was “simply not true” that he and Enzi were “fishing buddies,” and asserted that Enzi has received the vast majority of his campaign funds from Washington-based political action committees.

“Washington is not going to elect the next senator from Wyoming. The people of Wyoming will elect that senator,” Cheney said. He said his daughter’s campaign is “going full speed. She’s going to win.”

Asked to name a prominent Republican who can attract Democrats and independent voters, Cheney said he was “not going to predict or endorse anybody. We’ve got a long way to go to the next presidential election.”

On foreign policy matters, Cheney declined to weigh in on surveillance activities by the National Security Agency, saying he hadn’t been regularly briefed in five years.

He expressed skepticism that the Obama administration would be able to force Iran to comply with demands that it show its nuclear program is peaceful. Asked if military action against Iran was “inevitable,” Cheney said he had “trouble seeing how we’re going to achieve our objective short of that.”

Cheney faulted the Obama White House’s handling of Middle East politics, saying the U.S. presence in the region had been “significantly diminished” in recent years. “I think our friends no longer count on us, no longer trust us and our adversaries don’t fear us,” he said.

___

Follow Ken Thomas on Twitter at http://twitter.com/AP_Ken_Thomas

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/cheney-republicans-look-generation-144336717–election.html
Category: Red Sox Score   obamacare   apple event   Blackboard   jeff bezos  

Jessica Andrade delivered an all-time beating on Rosi Sexton


Jessica Andrade battered a tough Rosi Sexton for three rounds in the most one-sided, longest-lasting beatings in recent MMA memory Saturday in Manchester, England, at UFC Fight Night. From horn to horn, Andrade punched, kicked, kneed and elbowed Sexton almost entirely uncontested.

Sexton was clearly out on her feet by the second round as her face and head began to swell and bleed and her own strikes lost all sting but the referee chose to let Andrade continue her assault. The British MMA veteran survived until the final horn but never mounted any sustained offense of her own as she was bludgeoned by the young Brazilian.

The loss is Sexton’s second straight in the UFC. Andrade got back on the winning track with her unanimous decision win (30-26, 30-27, and 30-26) after losing to Liz Carmouche in her last bout.

“There were a few times where the fight could have been stopped,” Andrade told Joe Rogan in her post-fight interview. “But props to Rosi, she’s super tough.”

Source: http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/mma-cagewriter/jessica-andrade-delivered-time-beating-rosi-sexton-201117260–mma.html
Similar Articles: ohio state football   NSYNC VMA 2013   Claude Debussy   kim zolciak   2 Guns